Conrad Bo attempts to explain Picassofication in Superblur

I am Conrad Bo and Picassofication is a term that we in the Superblur Art Movement use to describe the art that we make that are directly and indirectly influenced by the art of Pablo Picasso. This art that we create can sometimes be reminiscent  to the art of other artists such as Francis Bacon, Basauiat, Jean Dubuffet, Miro, Karel Appel and The Cobra Art Movement etc. but I will argue that these artists would not have painted as they did if it was not for Pablo Picasso.

Picasso was a real innovator and made a lot of statements, and he also gave a lot of advice to anyone that care to listen to him. His statement of it took me 4 years to paint like Raphael but a lifetime to paint like a child is one of the greatest art quotes for me, and as an artist myself I believe this to be totally true.

 

Manifesto of The Superblur Art Movement:

1. Superblur refers to a method of creating art using the definition of the word blur.

2. Thus the focus of the art will be to make the object or classification of the art unclear or less distinct .

3. Superblur will also focus elements that cannot be seen or heard clearly.

4. When photography is used with the elements of Superblur in mind. The camera will be manipulated or even be shaken to blur the picture and the aim is to produce images that are similar to abstract art in painting.

5. Instead of creating art for the sake of art, elements of art movements such as Superflat, Superstroke, Cubism and so forth, will be blurred in an attempt to create art that will be known as Superblur art.

 

 

 

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